read the news // live the culture

Mark Lanegan & Duke Garwood – Black Pudding | Album review

  Tuesday 30th April 2013

Collaborator extraordinaire Mark Lanegan has hooked up with English multi-instrumentalist Duke Garwood for Black Pudding, their debut album on London-based independent record label Heavenly Records. Smoky voiced Seattle troubadour, Lanegan started out as frontman for Screaming Trees before joining Queens of the Stone Age in 2000. He later recorded albums with, amongst others, Soulsavers, Greg Dulli (ex-Afghan Whigs) and most prominently alongside Isobel Campbell (ex-Belle & Sebastian). Throughout his career he has also produced seven solo albums, though the collaborations have been far more copious.

black puddingLanegan has long been an admirer of Garwood, whose fingerpicking guitar work here greatly impresses. At certain points, particularly Pentecostal and the beautiful Manchester Special, it is reminiscent of Ry Cooder at his Paris, Texas peak. There are also shades of Nick Drake, the late great Bert Jansch and much early 70s English folk music – all of which makes for an atmospheric and pleasant listening experience, but also a slightly lacklustre one. There is little new here: the contrast of the gorgeous guitar twangs with Lanegan’s gravelly voice is of interest, but much of the album resembles background film music for a latter day Western, similar to what Nick Cave has recently produced.

It’s a very decent album, but one can’t help feeling that they can both do better solo work (there’s enough here to lead listeners back to Garwood’s earlier recordings). And despite the numerous side projects, Lanegan has done his best work with his own band, last year’s Funeral Blues being his best album since his magnum opus Bubblegum in 2004. Much to enjoy here, but they can both do better.

Verdict: 

Geoff Maguire

Black Pudding is released on 13th May, but you can pre-order the album here.

Watch the video for Pentecostal here

.

  Log in  

More about the author

avatar

Read more from...

Share this story


  • Pin It
  • Share on Google+
  • Reddit
  • Stumble
  • LinkedIn

Latest articles

Translations at the Rose | Theatre review
Translations at the Rose

After debuting in Sheffield in February, director James Grieve has brought his revival of Brian Friel’s play [read more]

Archimedes’ Principle at the Park | Theatre review
Archimedes’ Principle at the Park

Premiering in London after an award-winning sell-out run in Spain, Archimedes’ Principle is the theatrical adaptation [read more]

Jeeves and Wooster: Perfect Nonsense at the Duke of York’s | Theatre review
Jeeves and Wooster: Perfect Nonsense at the Duke of York’s

Perfect Nonsense is nonsense for sure, but not quite perfect. This new play is an attempt to revive and expand the [read more]

The Silver Tassie at the Lyttleton | Theatre review
The Silver Tassie at the Lyttleton

Irish playwright Sean O’Casey wrote The Silver Tassie in 1928 as a searing piece of theatre about the broken [read more]

Dan Wilson at St Pancras Old Church | Live review
Dan Wilson at St Pancras Old Church

Semisonic’s own Dan Wilson, on tour to promote his new studio solo album Love Without Fear, serenaded the audience at [read more]

Archives